What to do after an RV accident: a 10-step guide

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Sure, RV accidents can put a damper on your road trip, but they happen. If you find yourself involved in a motorhome accident, don’t worry. These 10 steps will guide you through the process and help you get back on the road in no time. 

Step 1: Check on yourself and your passengers

Once your vehicle is stopped, make sure you and your passengers are okay and able to exit the RV. If someone is injured, do not attempt to move them unless they’re in immediate danger. Otherwise, leave it to the first responders. 

Step 2: Check on other vehicles involved in the RV accident

After you’ve ensured everyone in your RV is okay, go check on passengers in any other vehicles involved. Render assistance if possible, but the same rules apply here — only move injured passengers if absolutely necessary. 

Step 3: Get to safety 

If your rig is still drivable, move your vehicle to the side of the road. Only do this if it is safe to do so. If your vehicle is towing a trailer, it’s best to leave it where it is as you don’t know the condition of your hitch. 

Step 4: Call 911

If you haven’t already called 911, do so. Even if it’s just a minor motorhome accident, call the police so they can assist you in getting your vehicle safely back on the road or towed. 

Step 5: Wait for help

Turn off the engine and turn on your hazard lights. If you have road flares, use those to let other cars know they need to slow down. 

Step 6: Exchange information

Exchange vehicle, contact, and insurance information with others involved. 

Make sure to jot down: 

  • Full name and contact information

  • Insurance company and policy number

  • Driver's license and license plate numbers

  • Type, color, and model of vehicle

  • Location of accident

Step 7: Document the accident

Gather thorough documentation of the accident. 

Important documentation after an RV accident includes:  

  • Name and badge number of all responding officers

  • A copy of the accident report

  • Photos of the damage to vehicles from different angles

  • Contact information of those involved, including witnesses

The more information the better!

Step 8: Notify your insurer 

You’ll want to get a hold of your RV insurance agent before leaving the scene of the accident. They’ll guide you through the claims process and make sure you have all the necessary information and documentation before you leave. 

Step 9: File a claim

The claims process varies depending on a variety of factor, including: 

  • Cause of the motorhome accident

  • Type of damage to the vehicles

  • Injuries

Your insurance agent will lead you through the claims process and help determine what you’ll have to pay out of pocket if anything. 

Step 10: Have your RV inspected by a professional

Take your RV to a mechanic or service center to identify the damage. Your insurance company may even recommend certain repair shops in your area. The sooner you can verify interior and exterior damage, the sooner you can start your claims coverage. 

Even if there doesn’t seem to be any damage from your RV accident at first glance, it’s always best to have it looked at by a professional. If you delay this, it may be too late to get those damages, however minor, covered by insurance. 

RV insurance matters

Like we said, accidents happen. In the event of a motorhome accident, you want RV insurance that keeps you covered. Roamly provides RV insurance for RV owners created by RV owners. So, if you’re in an RV accident, you know you have a plan that’ll get you back to your life on the road in no time! 

What Roamly can offer RV owners

Did you know you could save an average of 25% compared to other insurance companies by getting a comprehensive plan with Roamly? This insurance company was created by passionate RV owners,so they know exactly the type of coverage you need for your RV. No more paying for expensive features you don’t need.

Additionally, Roamly doesn’t stop covering your RV if you decide you want to rent it out on peer-to-peer networks like Outdoorsy. That means you can make extra money when you’re not using your RV.